Posts Tagged: crime writing

The announcement of my Edgar award as a Grand Master from the Mystery Writers of America has garnered congratulations and praise from all over the place.  I’m very grateful. It’s particularly fun or, in Facebook terms, to be “liked” (you like me, you really really like me) by old friends, some of whom I haven’t heard from in decades. The world at once seems bigger and smaller.  I thank you all for the congratulations about the Grand Master award, which won’t be presented till next April, by the way. I’ve been reflecting on the Grand Master , the only troubling aspect of which is that it’s a reminder that a long career preceded it, and that the... more

Read More of Max Allan Collins on Being a Grand Master

The TV series Quarry, based on Max Allan Collins' beloved series of books, has just finished  its first critically acclaimed season on Cinemax. The series has departed in some ways from the books. Here Max discusses those departures, inherent in any adaptation, and his feelings about the fresh direction the show has taken while finding its own, unique voice. It’s a first-rate show. The finale (like the opening episode) is a feature-length crime story worthy of release as an indie film. The Vietnamese war sequence – one long take – is as remarkable a piece of filmmaking as I’ve seen in some time, capturing the feel and pressure and insanity of battle. The cast has been... more

Read More of Collins on QUARRY: The Author Reviews His TV Series

Margeret Moseley's Milicent Le Sueur is one of the most charming and delightful characters in crime fiction. Today Margaret, the bestselling author of Bonita Faye, shares how she created the character. It was one of those zipity do dah spring mornings, one of the only fourteen or so we experience in Texas before the big heat comes; I was on the way to the hospital to welcome a new born great-niece into the world. Windows were down and a breeze was blowing. My radio wasn’t on, but I could hear singing outside my car when I stopped for a red light. I sat through several lights (early Sunday morning and no traffic) to listen to a young man, early twenties, good build and blowsy hair, sing... more

Read More of Writing MILICENT LE SUEUR: Born on a Zipity Do Dah Morning

A Brash Birthday

Two years ago today, Edgar Award nominated novelist Joel Goldman and #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Goldberg launched Brash Books with thirty titles, most of them acclaimed, award-winning books that had fallen out of print...and that we brought back in new print and digital editions.   Their mission was ambitious: to publish the best crime novels in existence. We believe we've lived up to their brash goal. We now have nearly 100 titles in print, a dozen of them brand new books, several by authors who've never been published before. We couldn't be more proud of our books and our incredible line-up of authors.   Everyone at Brash Books wants to give our... more

Read More of A Brash Birthday

ROAD TO PERDITION is coming back in November and is now available for pre-order from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iBooks, Kobo and Google Play.  It’s something of a dream come true for me to finally have my original version out there in the world. In 2002 I wrote a 70,000-word movie tie-in novel (okay, novelization) of the script for the movie that was based on my graphic novel. In my novel, I attempted to be true to the screenplay while weaving in material from the graphic novel as well as historical material about the real John Looney and his era. The DreamWorks licensing department put me through hell, making me cut anything – including dialogue! – that wasn’t directly... more

Read More of Max Allan Collins: The Long Road to Perdition

W.L Ripley is the author of the four acclaimed Wyatt Storme novels, which have won enthusiastic comparison by readers, critics, and fellow crime writers to the best of Robert B. Parker and John D. MacDonald. Today he talks about how his third Storme novel, Eye of The Storme, arose from his fascination with Branson, Missouri. In 1970, Branson, Missouri was a smattering of bait shops and convenience stores, population 2,550. A few years earlier, Silver Dollar City, an 1880’s theme park much like California’s Knott’s Berry Farm was added to augment the tourist attractions of boating, fishing and the outdoor theatre production of “Shepard of the Hills”. Today Branson is "the New... more

Read More of Writing Storme: Neon, Tough Guys, and the New Nashville