Posts Tagged: crime writing

RICHARD A. MOORE is a former reporter, a retired public relations executive, and the author of various short stories published by Ellery Queen, Alfred Hitchcock and other mystery magazines and anthologies. He played a big role in making it possible for Brash Books to acquire the rights to the published and unpublished works by Ralph Dennis, an author perhaps best known among crime writers for his 12 legendary Hardman novels...which we will begin re-releasing today. This essay has previously appeared, in various forms, on an array of crime fiction blogs... and is reprinted in the Brash edition of THE GOLDEN GIRL AND ALL, the third book in the Hardman series.  Ralph Dennis... more

Read More of The Literary Life of Ralph Dennis

The holiday season is upon us, and it's that time of year for gratitude and reflection. In this edition of the Brash Books newsletter, we share our fond remembrance of a beloved Brash author, along with another amazing award, a fresh new story, a rave review—and an abundance of upcoming releases for your reading pleasure. DOUBLE WIDE WINS AGAIN! The awards keep coming for DOUBLE WIDE and Leo W. Banks! Banks' debut thriller just received the 2018 Best Mystery Novel award from the New Mexico Book Co-op, announced at a gala awards banquet in Albuquerque on November 16th. Along with this latest honor, DOUBLE WIDE also has received two Western Writers of America 2018 Spur Awards and Best... more

Read More of A Brash Holiday Season is Coming

It's been a thrilling few weeks here at Brash Books, and we're blasting into July with plenty of excitement. Read on to learn more about latest releases, a new movie from one of our authors, our newest rave reviews, and all the fun we had at the Western Writers of America Conference. MEMPHIS LUCK IS HERE! Gerald Duff's MEMPHIS LUCK—the sizzling sequel to MEMPHIS RIBS—is finally available in trade paperback and ebook editions! The critics already love it, and we're sure you will as well. MEMPHIS LUCK finds homicide detectives J.W. Ragsdale and Tyrone Walker colliding with colorful characters in a darkly funny tale of mayhem. Publishers Weekly declares, "This black comedy catches... more

Read More of Brash Fireworks in July

According to Otto Penzler, the Grand Master Speaketh too long, actually, in accepting his “Edgar” at the banquet last Thursday at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York. I told Otto that maybe I should have dropped the thank you that I gave him for publishing the Mike Hammer short story collection recently. The banquet found me dressed in my James Bond Halloween costume. I was in great company – not only my wife Barb, but my agent Dominick Abel, Barbara Allan’s editor Michaela Hamilton (whose guests we were), Lee Goldberg and Joel Goldman of Brash Books, and Charles Ardai of Hard Case Crime, among others. We had ringside seats, and were right there to helplessly watch M.C. Jeffrey... more

Read More of Max Allan Collins: The Grandmaster Speaketh

Thanks to all of you who responded warmly to my update last week about the recently published “new and expanded” Road to Perdition prose novel. The sequel, Road to Purgatory, has just been reprinted by Brash Books in a uniform edition, and Road to Paradise will follow later this year or early next. So, with your patience, I’ll talk a little about how Road to Purgatory came about, and the challenges involved. The original graphic novel concept of Road to Perdition was developed for DC Comics editor Andy Helfer. Initially the plan was to do three 300-page graphic novels, each serialized in 100-page installments (the final book as... more

Read More of Max Allan Collins: Traveling the Long, Winding road to PURGATORY

There’s an old saying that it’s easier to edit than it is to write, but I’m not sure I’m all in on that. Especially when you’re writing long form fiction.   A question that comes up often when I’m in a discussion about writing is “Do you edit as you go, or at the end?”   My answer: depends on the writer. I write my first draft longhand, using a pencil and a small notebook. This allows me to get ideas down fast. I just write it out, regardless of whatever errors may exist. And I usually write a chapter at a time. Then I transcribe the handwriting onto my laptop file, and that usually serves as my first edit. And I try to make that my only edit at the... more

Read More of Phillip Thompson: Writing vs. Editing